15 Ways To Measure Your Health

I’ve been beating myself up over my weight lately. I’m only 2.5 kilograms over what I feel my ‘ideal’ weight is (where I feel lean but strong) but damn, it’s like I’m carrying a layer of Jell-O around my stomach. A trip to China (hello noodles), Christmas and last month’s birthday celebrations have been a series of wonderful but unfortunate events for my waistline. I’m hoping (okay, praying) that the weight gain is actually muscle thanks to hill running, heavier weights and increased protein intake. I plan to book in for my annual body composition assessment in coming weeks, but in the interim I’ve been reflecting on other ways to measure my health. 

For example, I can recall a time when I was a few kilograms lighter but I was sleep deprived, my skin was inflamed and my nails were constantly breaking. I also remember a time when I had a smaller build but I was injured, almost anaemic and my emotions were all over the place. A friend of mine has bemoaned her apparent recent weight gain but her energy levels and vitality are the best I’ve seen in years. Her face no longer looks drained. 

Below are 15 ways to measure your health, both inside and outside. I’m not saying to keep a diary of each of them, but by scanning through old photos or reflecting on recent months you may remember a time you felt your strongest, prepped meals brimming with fresh produce or simply slept through the night. Regardless, this list may just make you realise you’re doing better health-wise now than you think.

1. Weight

I’m putting this at the top of the list to get it out the way. Weight is a big part of your health, although it’s by no means everything. Ideal weight ranges differ based on your gender, ethnicity and stage of life. However, occasionally standing on the scales (or trying on those old jeans or a particular dress) can indicate whether you’re losing, gaining or maintaining weight. Increasing your muscle mass will lead to weight gain (it’s heavier than fat), as will water retention (hello, flying) and some medications. Your weight is just one measure of health, but it’s an easy one to track.

2. Waist

A better indication than weight perhaps, but still not flawless, is your waistline. Measuring your waist (and wrists if you’re really keen) is an effortless way to check your risk of obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers. I use the tape measure from my sewing kit to keep an eye on my waistline (currently 67 centimetres/ 26 inches). The Australian government guidelines are:

  • For men, have a waistline below 94cm (37 inches)
  • For women, below 80cm (31.5 inches)

3. Blood pressure/cholesterol/blood glucose

Unless you or a relative is a nurse, it’s unlikely you can assess these in your own home. However you can head to a pharmacy or local doctor to get them tested! Similar to your waist measurements, these tests help identify your risk of developing certain diseases. I’m able to get a free test each year through my private health insurance, but some work places also offer free testing. Ideally, your assessor will make recommendations (such as diet or lifestyle changes) based on your results if needed. 

4. Diet

A sign that I’m having a hectic week? I’m eating baked beans on toast, buying sushi and drinking Diet Coke. When do I feel at my best? Giant salads, stir-fries, fresh fruit and wholesome dinners brimming with vegetables. Of course, diet is linked to time – getting to a grocery store then also preparation – but setting aside an hour each week to roast some vegetables or make a curry will save hours during the week! If I’m having two serves of fruit, a giant plate of vegetables and avoid processed foods each day, I’m happy. 

5. In the bathroom

If you’re regularly running to the bathroom or feeling backed up – it’s not a great sign for health. There are plenty of charts on the Internet indicating what your toilet business should look like (and checking the colour of your urine will show how hydrated you are). Normal will differ from person to person, but if your bathroom habits in line with medical guidelines – give yourself a healthy high five! 

6. Skin

I’m no dermatologist or beautician – but my skin will tell you whether I’m refreshed, sleep deprived or eating too many store granola bars. I can recall a particularly stressful time in my life where I was a few kilograms lighter than now, but my face was inflamed and infected. It took a lot of courage to walk five minutes down the road without make-up to visit a beautician, who was shocked when she saw me (I haven’t gone back). When I was seriously overweight, I had acne as well. My skin isn’t flawless now but reducing stress, eating of a variety of fresh foods and having flaxseed each day have done a lot more than that once-off facial. 

7. Nails

In recent months, I’ve noticed my nails are much stronger than they used to be. They used to flake and break almost daily but the only change I can think of is that I’m actively eating more protein and trying to reduce stress. I suspect my calorie restriction (which resulted in successful weight loss) had a side-effect of inadequate nutrient which manifested in poor skin and nails. You could probably include hair in this category too – is it strong and shiny or dull and breaking? My hairdresser has noticed an improvement in my hair too. 

8. Immunity

If you’ve ever been seriously ill or injured, you probably didn’t care about how your jeans were fitting. You wanted to recover, be pain-free, regain strength and mobility. On a lesser note, you may have had times where you were just plagued by cold, flu and infections or generally felt rundown. But perhaps a virus went through your office and you escaped it? Or you’ve been injury free for 12 months! Immunity and resilience are a sure sign your health’s on track.

9. Sleep

How much sleep are you getting and how good is it? My New Years’ resolution in 2017 was to get seven hours, seven days a week. It didn’t always happen (and sorry to any parents reading this) but I try to go to bed at least seven hours before my alarm. A good nights’ sleep changes everything and I’ve invested in good quality sheets, duvets and pillows to try make that happen. I’ve also promised myself ‘don’t fight the tired’ – if my eyelids are drooping, abandon the task and go to bed. Yes, that’s why this blog post is late and there are piles of laundry strewn across my apartment. 

10. Energy

Closely linked to sleep, but worthy of its own category. Do you feel charged up or lethargic? Alert or hazy? Another measure: how often do you grab chocolate at 3pm? Again, parents and shift workers are likely to have tough days. The time I crawled back into bed after a Spin class (sweaty shorts and all) and slept for two hours or nearly concussed myself on my office keyboard are not good indicators. But I feel most energised when I’m fuelled by adequate sleep, good nutrition and exercise. 

11. Strength

If you lift weights, strength is an easy measure of health to track. I’m definitely lifting the heaviest weights of my life (although nothing compared to CrossFitters). Maybe you’re doing push ups on your toes, lifting groceries more easily or carrying a child for longer? Can you squeeze harder or lift higher in Pilates? If you’re in any way stronger than you used to be, congratulate yourself! 

12. Endurance

For runners and cyclists, endurance is another aspect of health that’s easy to track. I’m running 10K weekly post-injury and am increasing the intensity by including more inclines. You may be a regular walker and noticed you’re less puffed or walking for longer than when you first started. Your dance class might leave you less exerted, or you’ve doubled your treadmill time. Your ability to do an activity has improved, and therefore so has your health! 

13. Flexibility

This is perhaps my most valued measure of health. One of the main reasons I hit the gym is to future-proof my body against ageing. I want not just strength and endurance now, but I want to be agile and mobile in my old age. I did yoga yesterday for the first time in two weeks and was shocked when I attempted a deep Hindi squat – my hips refused to lower or loosen at all. Whether you’re a yogi, do Tai Chi or just occasionally stretch, are you gliding or grimacing? 

14. Stress

I could dedicate an entire post or even a blog to stress, but I’m not qualified or overly passionate on the topic. We’ve all had times in our lives where we’re waking during the night, running on adrenaline or feel sick to the core. It could be a specific problem – money, relationships or health – or sometimes it’s simply a build up of being busy. No task is stressful on its own, but the quantity can seem overwhelming. My solution is having a ‘GSD’ (get sh*t done) day, where I power through every essential or irritating errand on my to-do list. Otherwise, I generally try to reduce stress by making time for things that I know calm me – getting my nails done, baking, spraying a scent or even just breathing while a cup of tea brews. There will be calm and chaotic flows in life – but you’re no doubt in better health during the more restorative times. 

15. Emotions

This is related to stress, but I think it’s worthy of its own category. You may not be stressed, but how often do you feel peaceful or joyous? Are you more confident, less anxious or feeling better connected to people or communities around you? Can you recall the last time your face hurt from laughing so hard? Are you proud of yourself? Sure, I want those extra kilos to leave my body. But I haven’t seen a counsellor for two years, my skin is no longer a horror movie and I hiked a mountain last year with the man I love. That sounds pretty healthy to me, although I’m still going to have my annual health check – because while I know my body, I don’t have a medical degree. It’s all about balance! 

QUESTION: How do you measure your health? 

Five Ways to Use Lupin Flakes

Health foods have come a long way since I first went into a dedicated store in my teens. From the emergence of smoothie and salad bars alongside fast food at shopping malls to the explosion of alternative flours and milks, there has truly been a nutrition revolution. As someone who still remembers their first glass of watery, bitter soy milk and trying carob chocolate – these are good times. 

I love finding new health products to add variety to my mostly vegan diet. Buckwheat and quinoa are a lovely alternative to oats and I’ve recently been making the Italian flatbread farinata, which uses chickpea flour, for weekend brunches. I’ve also been trying to boost my protein intake from 70 grams a day to 110g/day. It’s been challenging but achievable, partly thanks to lupin flakes.

What is Lupin?

I first spotted lupin at one of my favourite health food spots The Clean Food Store and soon after I received them in a health foods subscription box. Lupin (also called lupini beans) is a legume that’s been used as animal feed for decades, but it’s only recently been widely marketed for human consumption. My home state, Western Australia, produces 85% of the world’s supply! The nutritional profile of lupin what impresses me most – it’s very high protein, low fat, low carbohydrate, and relatively low in calories. 

Specifically, one 40g (4 tablespoons) serve of lupin flakes contains:

  • 130 calories | 16g protein | 2.6g fat | 1.6g carbs | 14g fibre
  • It’s also gluten-free and has a low glycemic index (GI)

If that’s not attractive enough, lupin flakes are also quick cooking, fairly easy to find in Australia and only around AU$9 for a 400g bag (or about 90 cents a serve!). So how exactly do you use them? Read on. 

1. Soak

I received my first bag of lupin flakes about the same time I had an ageing orange in my fruit bowl. I grabbed a jar, some oats and had this delicious, high protein breakfast the next morning! 

 Lupin Bircher: high-protein and effortless.
Lupin Bircher: high-protein and effortless.

Lupin Bircher muesli (serves one)

  • 1/3 cup rolled oats
  • 1 tbsp lupin flakes
  • 1 orange, juice only 
  • 1 tbsp raisins 
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup milk (soy, almond, dairy etc) + extra for the morning
  • Optional toppings: yogurt, walnuts, pepitas, flaxmeal 

METHOD: Combine all ingredients except toppings in a bowl or jar, cover and refrigerate overnight. In the morning, add extra milk for a thinner consistency if desired. Otherwise, add toppings and enjoy!

2. Sprinkle

Sometimes the simplest things are the best. I’ve been sprinkling 1-2 tbsp of lupin flakes on my Greek soy yogurt and fresh fruit most afternoons. It’s so filling! There’s something about the nutty flavour of lupin with the sharp taste of natural yogurt that I’m hooked on too. This combination packs 10g of protein with the probiotic goodness of yogurt for just 130 calories – and still under 200 cals with berries or a slices of fresh peach. You could also add a tablespoon as a salad topper, although I’m yet to try this. 

3. Absorption/Boil

If you like Middle Eastern foods, you will love lupin! I tried substituting lupin flakes for quinoa in several dishes, but I find it works best as a replacement for cous cous. To quickly cook in the microwave, mix 4 tbsp of lupin flakes with 1/2 a cup of water on HIGH for three minutes. Cover for a few minutes and then fluff with a fork to enjoy as a side dish with a Moroccan tajine or stuffed capsciums. I want to try lupin in this way with a spicy Indial dal too! 

 Moroccan tagine: cooked lupin flakes taste sensational with Middle Eastern dishes! 
Moroccan tagine: cooked lupin flakes taste sensational with Middle Eastern dishes! 

4. Just Add 

In the same way I like to add flaxmeal to my breakfast and general baking, the neutral flavour of lupins means you can simply add it to a dish for a protein boost. One tablespoon in a bowl of oatmeal almost doubles the protein content, and you could similarly add a few tablespoons and lower the flour when making muffins or bread. It does have a slightly bitter, nutty taste so  I find just one tablespoon in a single bowl of oats is a good balance. For other cooking, start small and increase over time until you find the right balance. Or check out my lupin cake recipe below! 

5. Bake

When I got home late last week and hadn’t reached my protein target for the day, I had to get creative. I experimented with a lupin chocolate mug cake with surprisingly good results! This is not a rich, sweet mud cake. Rather, it has a denser texture more like polenta but it’s wholesome, chocolately and still a satisfying high-protein snack or dessert!

My Lupin Chocolate Mug Cake (vegan) 

  • 2 tbsp lupin flakes
  • 1 tbsp spelt flour
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tbsp cocoa
  • 1/8 tsp baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1/4 cup milk (soy, almond, dairy etc)
  • 1 tsp coconut oil
  • Optional: 1 tsp maple syrup

METHOD: Combine all ingredients in a mug and microwave on HIGH for 2 minutes. Check and microwave for another minute if needed. Eat with a spoon straight away or top with berries, peanut butter or coconut yogurt. 

More ideas 

I’m in the process of testing some high protein, vegan lupin cookies and plan to do a fruit crumble with lupin topping too. Like almond meal, you could also use lupin flakes to crumb meat, tofu or vegetables. When winter approaches, I’m going to try topping cauliflower cheese with lupin for a delicious crunch! 

I did attempt a lupin porridge but I found there wasn’t enough starch to make it very creamy, even when cooked with grated apple, soy milk and vanilla. I also added cooked lupin flakes to a bean salad but they soaked up moisture from the beans and tomatoes, resulting in a soggy lunch. Both meals were edible, but I prefer the recipes above. 

QUESTION: What’s your health food of the moment?

Perth’s Healthiest Restaurants

It’s never been easier to get a healthy breakfast and restaurant lunches are typically lighter and brimming with salad options. But when it comes to date night, catching a friend or a group event, dinner is a time where good intentions can be derailed. I love going out, exploring new venues and drinking a good glass of wine – my fitness routine is never going to stop that! But I don’t want to undo all my efforts at the gym by overindulging when I’m dining out. I don’t feel good after I eat greasy or carbohydrate-heavy meals (hence the lack of pizza or pasta in my posts – gnocchi with lots of tomato sauce excepted!) and too much wine makes my 5.30am alarm a struggle. 

While the definition of healthy food is subjective, I consider it as anything that’s minimally processed and eaten in moderation.  I try to avoid anything from a packet and instead eat a variety of fresh, seasonal fruit and vegetables daily with nuts, wholegrains and proteins. Dark chocolate and occasional home-baked treats like banana bread are all the sweetness I need. Thankfully, perhaps in reaction to fast-food and convenience meals, restaurants are increasingly focusing on fresh, seasonal produce. Whether you have specific dietary needs such as gluten free, follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, or simply want nutritious yet delicious meals, these restaurants are for you! Options range from casual to special occasion, and all but one venue serves meat and alcohol.

1. DeJa Vu tapas restaurant, Northbridge

Comprising a rooftop venue and a restaurant, a first glimpse of Dejavu‘s menu reveals cocktails, sliders, and pizza  – where’s the healthy you ask? Look closer. The pizzas are on activated charcoal bases. The hummus is made from carrots and served with vegetable sticks. Slider options include free range chicken and shredded jackfruit (vegans rejoice!) on house-made buns. There are also distinctly Australian flavours – think lemon myrtle, macadamia and damper. As for the cocktails Dejavu uses essential oils and coconut sugar syrups, and you’ll again find activated charcoal… in its tequila! The romantic rooftop setting and stunning service make this a magical night out. 

Cost: Tapas plates $8-16, sangria $8 and cocktails from $17.
Address: 2/310 William St, Northbridge | Website 

 Dejavu Rooftop: charcoal damper, sriracha hummus and vegetable sticks with a cocktail. 
Dejavu Rooftop: charcoal damper, sriracha hummus and vegetable sticks with a cocktail. 

2. New Normal, Subiaco

From the outside, this venue doesn’t look overly healthy. You’ll see wine, a rooftop bar and waitstaff with plates of delicious looking food. But on closer inspection, New Normal completely embodies my idea of healthy eating. The focus is on fresh, seasonal produce and it’s entirely sourced from Western Australia’s South West (drinks menu included). The menu changes so often, they don’t have paper copies (but if you’re shortsighted like me and can’t read the blackboard, you’ll be kindly given a chalkboard at your table). My boyfriend and I dined just before Christmas, choosing plates of tomato, golden beetroot, octopus and rosemary potatoes. I felt like we were in a renovated farmhouse, eating exceptional flavours picked straight from a garden. The atmosphere was intimate, wholesome and just lovely. Don’t wait another minute. Book your table now! 

Cost: Approx. $60 per person, including a bottle of wine. 
Address: 2/23 Railway Rd, Subiaco |  Website

 New Normal: golden beetroot and pumpkin with cranberries (goats cheese on the side).
New Normal: golden beetroot and pumpkin with cranberries (goats cheese on the side).

3. The Raw Kitchen, Fremantle

Remember that time before bliss balls and coconut wraps were widely available in supermarkets?The Raw Kitchen opened in Fremantle eight years ago, pioneering healthy eating in Perth. Today, it’s evolved to beautiful warehouse venue that offers yoga, healthy living workshops and even a zero-waste store. But back to the food. Despite its name, not everything is raw. Think yellow tempeh curries, raw nachos with ‘cashew cheese,’ and a ‘live’ pizza with dehydrated buckwheat base. There’s no dairy, gluten, refined sugar or additives. The wine list has preservative free, organic and biodynamic options too! Eating out never felt so good. 

Cost: Entrees/shares from $7, mains from $19, wine from $36 per bottle. 
Address: 181A High St, Fremantle | Website

 The Raw Kitchen: raw tacos filled with fresh salad and herbs, topped with cashew cheese sauce.
The Raw Kitchen: raw tacos filled with fresh salad and herbs, topped with cashew cheese sauce.

4. Post, Perth CBD

I’ve only been to Post for breakfast but it’s open for lunch and dinner, so it’s going on this list. Set in the city’s stunning State Buildings, the menu features several dishes designed by its Como Shambhala spa, aimed at being light and nutritious. Enjoy dishes such as quinoa spaghetti, salads with carrot top pesto and plenty of local seafood in a beautiful heritage setting (how long can you stare at that ceiling for?). I’ll be returning for Post’s Champagne brunch served Sundays from 11.30am – nut seed ‘real toast’ with avocado, buckwheat cannoli cacoa dessert and a glass of champagne of course! Post perfectly captures indulgence without excess and you can even get a spa treatment before or after, if you wish. 

Cost: Starters from $18, mains from $24. 
Address: State Buildings, corner of St George’s Tce & Pier St, Perth | Website

 Post: Dining feels like a spa experience with its nut and seed 'real toast' with avocado.
Post: Dining feels like a spa experience with its nut and seed ‘real toast’ with avocado.

5. Hanami, Mt Lawley

With a focus on simplicity and minimal cooking times, Japanese is a great option when looking for healthy dining options. But I specifically keep coming back to Mt Lawley’s Hanami because it’s always so fresh. Sure, there are spring rolls on the menu and you could choose fried chicken with a pile of white rice. But there’s also edamame, endless seafood, cold tofu, and the option to have 5 or 10 pieces of sushi (thumbs up for portion control). The ambience is lively and casual, the food is delicious and you can’t beat the prices. Japanese is also the perfect opportunity to skip the beer or wine and drink green tea all night too. 

Cost: Starters from $6, sushi from $6, mains from $17. 
Address: 685 Beaufort St, Mt Lawley | Website

Want More Healthy Dining?

If you’d like breakfast or brunch ideas, check out Perth’s Healthiest Cafes! There are so many new venues opening, I’ll be doing another post soon showcasing the latest additions. Subscribe to my e-newsletter to get an alert. 

QUESTION: Where do you go for a healthy dinner out?